This Bibliography is also available in a [tabulated layout ]  (suitable for large screens of desktops and laptops)


Rev. J. B. Reade (18011870): a Bibliography
Part 1, works written by Reade

Compiled and annotated by R. D. Wood

When the author’s work on ‘J. B. Reade and the early history of photography’ was published in 1971, a ‘Bibliography of Joseph Bancroft Reade (1801–1870)’ had been prepared and was due (it could be said in a footnote to that publication) “to be published”. However, for one reason and another, this did not happen. A few items have been added in the intervening years.
This bibliography has remained unpublished but a copy is held by the library of the Royal Society (RS library: Tracts X499/3). In developing this website it is appropriate to make it available here below.

The Bibliography is in two parts. First, the writings of Reade himself (items 1-110, see below), those published during his lifetime and a small number of manuscripts. Secondly, published work by other persons and reports which mention Reade, during his lifetime, and work of a historical nature that has appeared from his death at the end of 1870 to today. That Part 2, of writings on Reade, is still in course of preparation as a webpage and will be placed online when appropriate.

Here presented is the bibliography of his own writings. This page provides the bibliography in plain text in endnote style and with notes on many of the entries. This layout is suitable for all sizes of screens (including that of small screen devices - smart phones) and for printing. Also for all devices you can download a PDF file of this plain text layout.
Another webpage version of the bibliography is available in table form with many columns in a tabulated spreadsheet layout, good for desktops but not suitable for viewing on screens of smart phones or even on smallest tablets. One advantage of that table form is that its column 10 provides a classification of the subject, or main subject, of each item. The classes are the subjects of microscopy or the microscope (Micro), photography (photo), optics, chemistry (Chem) , astronomy (Astron), antiquarian (Antiq), General or family matters (Gen), and his surviving manuscript material (MSS).

Provided on the lower section of this page is an [index] to Reade’s published writings and manuscripts covered in this bibliography.


1.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., of Caius College, Cambridge,
On a New Method of illuminating Microscopic Objects,
Appendix 2 of C. R. Goring and A. Pritchard, Micrographia; containing practical essays on reflecting, solar, oxy–hydrogen gas microscopes, micrometers, eyepieces &c., London 1837, pp. 227–231
Letter dated ‘Peckham, Nov. 1836’. See also comment by A. Pritchard in his Preface, p. vi. This communication was also reprinted in Annals of Electricity, March 1840, Vol 4 (No. 23), pp. 407–9

2a.  Rev. J. B. Reade. Communicated by J. G. Children, Esq., Sec. R. S.,
Observations and Experiments on the Solar Rays that occasion Heat; with the application of a remarkable property of these rays to the construction of the Solar and Oxy–hydrogen Gas Microscopes,
Proceedings of the Royal Society, Vol. 3 (1830-1837), No. 28 (8 December 1836 – 16 March 1837), p. 457
Read at Royal Society meeting 22 December 1836: ‘By the Rev. J. B. Reade. Communicated by J. G. Children, Esq, Sec.R.S.’. Also in Philosophical Magazine (3rd Series), March 1837, Vol. 10 (No.60), 219–20. See also item 82.

2b.  Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph Manuscript dated 9 December 1836 of the above paper,
Royal Society, Archive Papers AP20.14,
This paper received an adverse Referee’s Report by Charles Wheatstone: Royal Society, RR 1.193

3.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A. * Communicated by the Author,
On a Method of producing Achromatic Light in Solar and Oxy–hydrogen Microscopes, and on the Effect of a Current of Air upon the Rays that occasion Heat,
Philosophical Magazine [The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science] (3rd Series), March 1837, Vol. 10 (60), pp. 184–7
* Communication dated ‘Peckham, Feb 10, 1837’

4.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A. * Communicated by the Author,
On the Existence of Structure in the Ashes of Plants and their Analogy to the Osseous System in Animals,
Philosophical Magazine (3rd Series), July 1837, Vol. 11 (64), pp. 13–17, and plate 1
* Communication dated ‘Peckham, April 27, 1837’. The ‘note’ at end of the paper was quoted by G. A. Mantell, Wonders of Geology, 1st edition (1838), Vol. 2, pp.565–6. See also item 8 and first half of item 9

5a.  Rev. Mr. Reade, of Peckham,
Roman Coin Moulds found at Lingwell–Gate, near Wakefield, 1820,
Numismatic Journal, June 1837–April 1838, Vol. 2, pp. 58–9
Communication dated ‘Peckham June 15, 1837’, read at meeting that day of Numismatic Society. See further icro–geological investigation by Reade, item 13. Reade’s interest in the coin moulds was probably due to the publication that year of the Transactions of the Philosophical and Literary Society of Leeds in which appeared a paper on the Lingwell–Gate Coin Moulds by John Hey of Leeds read originally in 1831.

5b.  Rev. – Reade,
On Roman Coin Moulds found at Lingwell Gate, near Wakefield, 1820,
The Athenæum, 11 November 1837, Vol. (524), p. 835
This item appears (in third person and editorial rewording) in The Athenæum in third instalment of a delayed report (pp. 802, 818–9, 835–6) of Numismatic Society meeting of, it is said, ‘25 May 1837 (concluded)’. But obviously the papers in the third instalment were really of a later meeting. ‘Examined the moulds at power of 300 and finds they abound with fossil infusoria principally of species of noviculae and an undescribed species of Gaillonella.’

6.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
An Inquiry into the Origin of the Solid Materials found in the Ashes of Plants, their structure and office during the period of life, and the effect of their subsequent addition in the crust of the earth,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1837, Part 2, pp. 103–4
Read before the Zoology and Botany section of the 7th meeting of the British Association held in Liverpool. ‘A series of more than thirty microscopical illustrations accompanied the paper’

7.    Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A.,
On the Chemical Composition of Vegetable Membrane and Fibre*; with a Reply [letter to Prof. Lindley from Reade dated Peckham, Sept 18, 1837] to the Objections of Professor Henslow and Professor Lindley,
Philosophical Magazine (3rd Series), November 1837, Vol. 11 (69), pp. 421–28
‘Dated Peckham, Aug.28, 1837’. ‘* Read [by the Secretary] before Section D, Zoology and Botany, of the Seventh Meeting of the British Association held in Liverpool; and now communicated by the Author’. The title only of the paper appeared in Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1837, Part 2, p. 104. A brief report of the paper as read at the British Association meeting, along with remarks made by Professors Henslow and Lindley, appeared in The Athenæum, 16 September1837, p. 684

8.    Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A. *Communicated by the Author,
Further Observations on the Structure of the Solid Materials found in the Ashes of recent and Fossil Plants,
Philosophical Magazine (3rd Series), November 1837, Vol. 11 (69), pp. 413–17
* Communication dated ‘Peckham, Oct. 2, 1837’. A short extract from this paper appeared in Gideon Mantell,

Wonders of Geology, 1st edition (1838), Vol. 2, p. 566 Criticised by M. J. Schlieden (1838, item ), and J. Lindley, Introduction to Botany, 3rd edition, London 1839, pp. 289–90. See also items 4 &10.

9.    Rev. J. B. Reade.,
Rev. J. B. Reade, on Fossil Infusoria; in a Letter [dated Peckham, Dec. 1837] to Gideon Mantell, Esq. LL.D.
Appendix L of Gideon Mantell, Wonders of Geology (1st edition, London: Relfe & Fletcher, 1838), Vol. 2, pp. 684–8 (later greatly shortened and abstracted in 7th edition of 1858, Vol. 2, pp. 716–7, 951–3).
Any significance of this letter lies not so much in the text (the first half refers to Reade’s recent paper above (item 8) and almost all the second half being quotations from recent publications on fossil infusoria of C. G. Ehrenburg), but in the microscope illustrations (figs 78–80 on pp.686–7), including one of ‘Xanthidia’ in Flint of Sydenham. Reade published more details of the latter work within the year as item 12. See also Mantell’s own text ‘Organic remains in the Metamorphic Rocks??’, pp. 658–661, 688.

10.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On the Existence of Spiral Vessels in the Roots of Dicotyledonous Plants,
Annals of Natural History, April 1838, Vol. 1 (2), pp. 111–3
Communication on the spiral vessels in the root of mustard, dated ‘Peckham, Feb 10, 1838. To Richard Taylor, Esq.’

11a. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
An Inquiry into a new Theory of earthy Bases of Vegetable Tissues,
Proceedings of the Royal Society, Vol 4 (1837–1843), No. 32 (15 February 1838 – 5 April 1838), pp. 52–3
Read at Royal Society, 8 March 1838. Looks at distribution of silica in plant tissues, and comparing his results with work by F.V. Raspail and Golding Bird, ‘proposes to substitute, in the description of vegetable tissues, the term skeleton, instead of that of bases.’

11b. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph manuscript dated 27 February 1838 of the above paper,
Royal Society, Archive Papers AP21.19,
An adverse Referee’s Report (Royal Society, RR 1.194) was written by J. F. Royle on this paper: ‘a very interesting subject to which not enough attention has been paid to which it deserves... but Mr Reade’s technical terms are too imprecise and wants definiteness’.

12.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On Some New Organic Remains in The Flint of Chalk,
Annals of Natural History, November 1838, Vol. 2 (9), pp. 191–8, and plates 8, 9.
Communication dated ‘Peckham, October 5, 1838’. Reade speaks of ‘the image of the objects having been thrown on paper by means of a camera eyepiece, and then carefully drawn’, providing additional evidence that he did not use photography before 1839. This study was stimulated by pioneering work of C. G. Ehrenberg and in its turn was very quickly, but briefly, cited by Ehrenberg (‘Bildung der Kreidefelsen’, Akademie der Wissenschaften Berlin, 20 December 1838). As Reade’s illustration of ‘Xanthidia’ was the first to be published (preceding even Ehrenberg), the plates illustrating micro fossils are of significance, drawing attention from both contemporary and late 20th century geologists. In particular this work by Reade received a wider notice from comments in various editions of books by his friend Gideon Mantell (Wonders of Geology and Medals of Creation), as well as being cited by Mantell in a paper discussing ‘Microscopical examination of the Chalk and Flint of South–east of England’ read before the Geological Society in 1845 (Annals and Magazine of Natural History, August 1845). The period over which Reade did the microscopy of the Xanthidia, etc., can be judged from the second half of his earlier letter to Mantell dated December 1837 (item 9, above). The historical context of this paper has been discussed by Prof. W. A. S. Sarjeant (Microscopy, February 1970).

13.   Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Observations on the Roman Coin–Moulds found at Lingwell–gate, near Wakefield, in the years 1697, 1706, 1820, and 1830,
Numismatic Chronicle, June 1838–April 1839, Vol. 1, pp. 161–5
Read at Numismatic Society 22 Nov 1838. As Reade had recently been able to visit Lingwell–gate and microscopically examine the local soil, he was providing an update on his earlier paper presented the previous year, item 5

14.   Rev. J. B. Reade,
Mr. Reade on Photography: ‘Some curious results connected with Mr. Talbot’s process of Photogenic Drawing’, 28 February 1839
Royal Society: Miscellaneous Correspondence MC 3.15,
Four page autograph MS dated ‘Peckham Feb: 28: 1839’ preserved in archives of the Royal Society. Published on pp. 32–3 of R. Derek Wood, ‘J. B. Reade, F.R.S., and the Early History of Photography’, Annals of Science, March 1971, Vol. 21 (1), pp.13–83

15.   J: B: R:,
Autograph letter dated ‘Leeds 1 April 1839’ from J. B. Reade to his brother George at Guisborough, Yorkshire,
Royal Photographic Society Collection.
J. B. Reade’s letter, written while visiting his father at Albion Place, Leeds, is on two pages of one folded sheet, the other two pages being a letter to his brother George from his father. Published by A. T. Gill, Photographic Journal, January 1961, pp.10–11

16.  J. B. Reade,
Manuscript copy of letter from J. B. Reade dated ‘Peckham. April 9, 1839’ to E. W. Brayley. (This letter copied for legal purposes has ‘Examined with the original. E. W. Brayley Jun. London Institution. June 17, 1854’),
Lacock Abbey Collection LA 54.34, [In 2007 the Talbot Collection moved from Lacock to the British Library. LA54.34 was re-catalogued at BL as Add MS 88942/4/1/15.]
An attached statement of 17 June 1854 by E. W. Brayley says he read the second half of the letter (on the photographic use of gallate of silver) to an audience at the London Institution on 10 April 1839. See also item 33 and R. D. Wood, 1972 (Item , in Part 2 of this Bibliography)

17a. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On the construction and use of Single Achromatic Eye–Pieces, and their superiority to the double eye–piece of Huyghens,
Proceedings of the Royal Society, Vol 4 (1837–1843), No. 41 (12 December 1839 – 20 February 1840), p. 195
Read at Royal Society on 9 January 1840.‘The achromatic eye–pieces which he uses were made by Messrs. Tulley and Ross, and are of the description usually termed single cemented triples.’

17b. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph manuscript dated Peckham, Nov.12, 1839, of the above paper,
Royal Society, Archive Papers AP23.39
When this paper was considered (Royal Society, Committee of Physics, 12 March 1840) for full publication in Philosophical Transactions, two adverse Referee’s Reports by G. B. Airy dated 25 February 1840 (Royal Society, RR 1.191) and G. Dollond (RR 1.192) were upheld.

18a. J. B. Reade, Vicar of Stone, Bucks.,
Registration of Births [Letter to editor of The Times dated 20 October 1840],
The Times (London), 28 October 1840, p. 6
This letter resulted in a reply from W. H. Matthews, Registrar for the Somers–town district, in The Times, 29 October 1840, p.2, and in turn Reade wrote the following response (item 18b)

18b. J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage,
Registration of Births [follow–up letter dated 31 October 1840 to the editor of The Times],
The Times, 4 November 1840, p. 3

19.  Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
The process of charring Vegetable Tissue as applied to the examination of the Stomata in the Epidermis of Garden Rhubarb [with ‘Postscript’],
Transactions of the Microscopical Society, 1844, Vol. 1, pp. 40–43 and Plate 1
Two short papers read at Microscopical Society of London, 21 July and 24 November 1841, dated ‘Stone Vicarage, Aylesbury, May 25, 1841’ and November 20, 1841. Had previously been reported in The Microscopical Journal and Structural Record for 1841, [Vol. 1], pp. 109, 174–5. The postscript was written in answer to experiments on Reade’s technique by Dr. Thomas Williams (‘On the Structure and uses of the Stomata’, The Microscopical Journal... for 1841, pp. 118–121).

20. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On Liebig’s Theory of Fallow Crops,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1842, Vol. Part 2, pp. 64–5

21. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Letter ‘upon various matters’ relating to Ammonia and Nitrogen’,
The Microscopical Journal and Structural Record for 1842, [Vol. 2], p.319
An abstract of a letter read at 16 November 1842 meeting of the Microscopical Society of London, the same text as recorded in manuscri pt volume ‘Minutes of the Ordinary and Annual Meetings, Vol 1, Jan 1840 – June 1868’ in the Archives of the Royal Microscopical Society (preserved at the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford), and was also reported in The Athenæum, 1842, p. 1042. The intention of the letter was to dispute Liebig’s statement that ‘the nitrogen of the air is applied to no use in the animal economy’

22a. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Microscopic Chemistry No. 1. On the existence of Ammonia in Gum, Sugar, and other non–azotised Bodies,
The Athenæum, 7 January 1843, No. 793, pp.19–20
Report of a letter read at 21 December 1842 meeting of Microscopical Society of London, and same text in third person in the manuscript ‘Minutes of the Ordinary and Annual Meetings, Vol 1, Jan 1840 – June 1868’ in the Archives of the Royal Microscopical Society (Museum of the History of Science, Oxford). Mentioned only very briefly by President (J. Lindley) in Report of the Third Anniversary of the Microscopical Society of London (1843), p.12

22b. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Microscopic Chemistry No. 2. On the existence of Ammonia in Vegetable Substances described as containing Nitrogen,
The Athenæum, 15 April 1843, No. 807, p. 370
Also a full report in The Phytologist, 1843 'Second Annual Part', p.560. Second letter read at ‘Microscopical Society – 15 March’ 1843 . See also manuscript ‘Minutes of the Ordinary and Annual Meetings, Vol 1, Jan 1840 – June 1868’ and very briefly abstracted in Report [for 1843] of the 4th Anniversary Meeting of the Microscopical Society of London (1844), pp. 6–7. Reade asserted he could detect very minute quantities of ammonia in the seeds of plants, by burning (for example) field beans, collecting the gas given off onto slips of glass moistened with hydrochloric acid, and detecting crystals of hydrochlorate of ammonia with the microscope.

23.1 – 23.18 J. B. Reade,
Eighteen autograph letters to ‘My dear Cousin’, Miss Salmon, Miss Rushfield, dated between 16 April 1841 and 1847,
A. L. Reade Collection in possession of R. Hamilton Reade of Sevenoaks, Kent.
In December 1969 the present compiler wrote to Hamilton Reade asking for information about a collection of letters written by J. B. Reade that had once been in the possession of Aleyn Lyell Reade (1876–1953), author of The Reades of Blackwood Hill (1906). Hamilton Reade replied in a letter dated 24 December 1969: the collection of material that had been passed to him from A. L. Reade was mainly earlier family letters of Thomas Shaw Bancroft Reade (J. B. Reade’s father), considerably damaged by dry rot, but (also in poor condition) a ‘Bundle of letters by Joseph Bancroft Reade which start “My dear cousin”... The first, dated 16 April 1841, is addressed to Miss Salmon. There are four more in 1841, two in 1845, three in 1846 and 6 or 7 in 1847, ... one undated (1844?) starting the same way addressed apparently to a Miss Rushfield’. In June 1972, visiting Hamilton Reade at Sevenoaks, the compiler was able to have only a very brief look at the bundle of short letters which appeared to be of insubstantial family affairs. More than a quarter of a century later, at the time in 1999 when this Bibliography is being prepared for publication, it has not been possible to establish the present whereabouts of these letters.

24. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 14 May 1843 from Rev J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/ H5/10,
This first of eight autograph letters in the Lee Collection from Rev J. B. Reade to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell dated between 1843 and 1851 discusses plans to build a substantial Observatory in the grounds of Stone vicarage.

25. J. B. Reade,
The Comet of Faye, Letter to editor of The Times dated 9 February 1844,
The Times, 13 February 1844, p. 6

26. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 4 June 1844 from Rev J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/ H5/11,
Writes of difficulties in obtaining observations for timing clock, of an Edward I silver penny found under chancery, new road to the church and other improvements, and wishes to build a school on the British System. Will spend July in the North.

27. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 19 June 1844 from Rev J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/ H5/12,
Dr. Gideon Mantell wants to put a plate of Hartwell fossil’s in his Medals of Creation. Concerned that Mantell should not risk his health from overwork. Agrees to exchange land at Stone. Due to spend the day at Clayden with Sir Henry Verney.

28.  J. B. Reade,
Seven Observations (Co–ordinate Tables only) of various Comets, communicated to the Royal Astronomical Society in 1844, 1845, 1846, and 1850:

28.1  Title only, without text or table, of ‘Observations of the Comet of Faye ... Observations made at Hartwell, Bucks. By the Rev. J. B. Reade. Communicated by Dr. Lee’, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 March 1844, Vol. 6 (No. 5), p. 57

28.2  ‘De Vico’s First, or Periodical Comet ... Observations made at Dr. Lee’s Observatory, Hartwell. By Mr. John Glaisher and the Rev. J. B. Reade’, Monthly Notices RAS, 9 May 1845, Vol. 6 (No. 16), p. 239

28.3  ‘D’Arrest’s Comet ... Observations at Dr. Lee’s Observatory, Hartwell. By Mr.[John] Glaisher and Rev. Mr. Reade’, Monthly Notices RAS, 9 May 1845, Vol. 6 (No. 16), p. 240

28.4   ‘Biela’s Comet. Hartwell. Dr. Lee’s Observatory (Rev. J. B. Reade)’, Monthly Notices RAS, 8 April 1846, Vol. 7 (No. 6), p. 82

28.5   ‘Relative positions of the two heads of Biela’s Comet. Hartwell. Dr Lee’s Observatory (Rev. J. B. Reade)’, Monthly Notices RAS, 8 April 1846, Vol. 7 (No. 6), p. 83

28.6   De Vico’s Third Comet. Observations. Dr. Lee’s Observatory (Rev. J. B. Reade)’, Monthly Notices RAS, 8 April 1846, Vol. 7 (No. 6), p. 84

28.7   ‘Peterson’s Third Comet ... Stone. On the Meridian (Rev. J. B. Reade and Mons. [F.] V. Fasel)’, Monthly Notices RAS, 10 May 1850, Vol. 10 (No. 7), pp. 150–1.
The Polar Distance and Right Ascension Co–ordinates provided in the table on p. 150 are for the period between 2 to 17 June, which is at a late period when the by then faint comet was disappearing from sight (and indeed is a month after the nominal date of this issue of the journal!). Other observations of the path of this comet from other observatories throughout Europe which appear in this journal were all taken in May. After the table, a note is added on the following page 151 regarding the system of wires used in the transit telescope at Stone.

29. Rev. J. B. Reade,
On Animals of the Chalk still found in a living state in the Stomachs of Oysters,
Transactions of the Microscopical Society, 1849, Vol. 2, pp. 20–24
This paper was read at the Microscopical Society of London on 11 December 1844, but the publication of the Transactions was greatly delayed. However, the paper had also been first reported in detail in an account of the meeting in The Zoologist, 1845, Vol 2, pp. 811–3. More than four-fifths of this paper was quoted by Jabez Hogg in his book The Microscope (1854), pp. 241-244.

30. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On the Cilia and Ciliary Currents of the Oyster,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1845, Part 2, pp. 66–7
Communication read at the meeting on 13 June 1845 of the Zoology and Botany Section of the British Association held in Cambridge. The full text was also published in The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, August 1845, Vo. 16 (No. 103), pp. 124–5. The title does not adequately express the subject of the communication which is another version of the preceding paper (item 29), not concerning cilia but has thoughts leading in turn from the abundance of the food of bivalves – infusoria, to speculation about their wide fossil contribution to geological formation. But one sentence of this communcation does have some interest: ‘When they are examined under the microscope by such an arrangement of transmitted light as makes the Infusoria luminous points on a perfectly dark field, it is immediately seen that the action of the cilia.. produces a strong current in the water...’ It shows again how darkground microscopy was a continuing occupation of Reade and there can be little doubt that he was a skilful manipulator with the microscope.

31. Joseph Bancroft Reade,
Certain Improvements in Inks, and in the Processes by which the same are Manufactured, and the Application of some of these Processes to the Production of certain Salts,
Patent No. 11,474
The Title of this patent was sealed on 3 December 1846 and at the Enrolment Office in London the Specification was enrolled six months later (the standard period of delay) on 3 June 1847. The original parchment Roll ‘66th Part of the Close Rolls 1847’ is preserved at the Public Record Office, C54/13532, membranes 37–40. The body of the specification was published in The Mechanics’ Magazine, June 1847,Vol. 46 (1243), pp. 549–51

32. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On two new salts of Gold,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1847, Part 2, p. 57
See also item 54 (1857)

33. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
Text of Letter ‘communicated by Mr Reade, on the 9th of March [sic!] 1839, to E. W. Brayley’,
on pp. 470–1 of ‘Photography’ by Sir David Brewster, North British Review, August 1847, Vol. 7, pp. 465–504
First publication of this letter, but the whole text was not provided and it was here misdated March 1839, of great historiographic consequence regarding mis–understanding of Reade's first photography. See item 16 for the complete letter showing date was really 9 April 1839 and an analysis by R. D. Wood, 1972 (item XXX, in Part 2 of this Bibliography). See also items 61–62 (two letters to Brewster in 1862) for comments made many years later by Reade to Brewster regarding the part played by Brewster in drawing attention to his letter to Brayley.

[for additional chronological entry, see item 109
Observations on the Aurora Borealis of 24 October [1847]
Bucks Herald (Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire), 30 October 1847].

34. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph copy sent to Dr. John Lee of a letter dated 15 May 1848 from Rev J. B. Reade to E. Reeves, Fee Farm Rent Office, regarding Farm Rent,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/H5/13,
Copy of his letter to Fee Farm Office, Lyon’s Inn, London, stating with regard to a demand on Lord Chesterfield’s property ‘As no Vicar of Stone ever paid this rent you will scarcely be surprized that I did not sent you a post office order’.

35. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 16 November 1848 from Rev J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/H5/14,
Provides list of 6 persons who voted for and 5 against a rule of the Bucks Architectural & Archæological Society excluding Dissenters. The rule seemed to Reade ‘so very absurd’, and there was a general feeling against it. Reports observations of the planet Mercury.

36a. J. B. Reade,
Copy letter dated 9 January 1849 from J. B. Reade (while staying with brother, George, at Hutton Low Cross, Guisborough, Yorkshire) to Council of the Royal Astronomical Society on sale of glebe land at Stone.,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/H 12/10/9(ii),
Written to RAS as Patrons of the Living at Stone, concerns sale of 20 acres of glebe land for building the County Lunatic Asylum. Copy apparently obtained by Lee from Mr. Williams at the RAS in February 1849. Autograph seems not to have survived at the Royal Astronomical Society.

36b. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 7 February 1849 from J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/H 12/10/9(i),
After briefly referring to Mr. [James] Glaisher’s examination & notes on the thermometer at Stone Observatory, this letter mainly concerns the sale of glebe land at Stone for the building of the County Lunatic Asylum [See also mention of the 20 acres in item 102]

37. Rev. J. B. Reade,
On reducing the aperture of the Huygenian eyepiece in observations of the Sun,
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 June 1849, Vol. 9 (No. 8),pp. 215–6
A report of the Astronomical Society meeting of 11 May in The Athenæum, 26 May 1849 (No. 1126), p.544, says only that a communication was read ‘from the Rev. J. B. Reade on the Adaption of a small eyehole to the eyepieces of Telescopes’. See also item 39

38. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 10 September 1849 from Rev J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/H10/7 and a contempory copy of the letter in D/LE/H5/15,
This letter relating to local archæology was accompanied (D/LE/H10/8) by a drawing of a section of a mound, which Reade concluded was a natural geological feature, not an archæological tumuli created by man. Data from Reade’s letter was later published by W. H. Smyth, Aedes Hartwellianae (1851), p. 5

39. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
On a New Solid Eye–piece,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1850, Part 2, pp. 15–16
Also reported in The Athenæum, 17 August 1850, pp. 876–7. See also similar items 37 and 42

40. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 23 May 1851 from Rev J. B. Reade, Stone Vicarage, to Dr. John Lee of Hartwell,
Buckinghamshire Record Office, Aylesbury. Dr John Lee, Hartwell MSS: D/LE/H5/16,
To canvass the Parish to form an Emigration Fund. Previous night was at Lord Londesbrough’s house in Picadilly, having conversation with Sir David Brewster, J. Y. Akerman, Dr Leeson. Mentions antiquarian objects exhibited there.

41. Rev. J. B. Reade,
A Saxon Broach found at Stone [Exhibits accompanying ‘An Account of Roman Remains at Stone’ by G. D. Brandon, pp.95–6],
Archæological Journal, 1851, Vol. 8, p. 96
Nine years earlier Reade had shown this Saxon broach or Fibula, found at Stone around early 1840, to J. Y. Akerman who, in a communication dated 27 December 1842, provided an engraving and description ‘Ancient Fibular found at Stone, Buckinghamshire’ in Archæologia(Society of Antiquaries London), Vol.30, [1842–]1844, Appendix pp.545–7. Akerman also briefly mentioned the fibula in his ‘An account of the Discovery of Roman and other Sepulchral Remains, at the village of Stone...’, i>Archæologia, Vol.34, [1850–] 1852, pp. 21–32.

42. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Solid Eye–pieces (Exhibit No. 254A in Class X),
Exhibition [1851] of the Works of Industry of All Nations: Reports by the Juries, 1851, Vol. 2, pp. 583–4 [Vol 2 of 4–volume illustrated set, and same pages of Vol 1 of standard un–illustrated edition].
The Jury awarded Reade a Prize Medal for this exhibit. Reade’s Solid Eye–piece is mentioned by James Glaisher, ‘Philosophical Instruments and Processes’ in Lectures on the Results of the Great Exhibition of 1851 (Delivered before the Society of Arts), London 1851, p.358. See also footnote in item 44, and item 78.1

43. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Cyaniodide of Iron (Exhibit No. 3A in Class II),
Exhibition [1851] of the Works of Industry of All Nations: Reports by the Juries, 1851, Vol. 1, p. 117
‘...exhibited cyaniodide of iron, a new variety of soluble Prussian Blue and pure iodide of potassium. In the composition of the former substance, iodine is supposed to play the part of oxygen or cyanogen.’ Brief attention is given to Reade’s soluble Prussian Blue by Robert Hunt in two of his publications on the Exhibition: ‘The Science of the Exhibition’ in The Art–Journal Illustrated Catalogue of the Industries of All Nations, London 1851, p.III*, and Hunt’s Hand–Book to the Official Catalogues: An Explanatory Guide to ... the Great Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations, 1851, London 1851, p. 276

44. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On the Observatory at Stone Vicarage, near Aylesbury,
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 12 May 1854, Vol. 14 (no. 7), pp. 196–8
Cost of building was £244.8s.3. and the instruments (16–foot Refractor telescope, Transit instrument, and meteorological instruments) were £243.19s.9d. Dated Stone, May 9, 1854, it is published in the Monthly Notice for the meeting of 12 May 1854, but it would seem from the Report of the Council provided at the following AGM (Monthly Notices, Vol. 15, p.145) that it was not actually read at that meeting. See also item 47.

45. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On Some Early Experiments in Photography, being the substance of a letter [dated 13 February 1854] addressed to Robert Hunt, Esq.,
Philosophical Magazine (4th Series), May 1854, Vol. 7 (46), pp. 326–31
Immediately reprinted in Notes & Queries, 3 June 1854, Vol 9, pp. 524-5 but omitting second half concerning Thomas Young's spectrum experiments in 1803. Also published in full in Hunt's Researches on Light, 2nd edition London 1854, appendix 2 on pp. 371-5. Reade had offprints, for example sending one to R. Owen, see item 53

46. Rev. J. B. Reade.,
‘Rev. J. B. READE, on Mr. H. Fox Talbot's Claim to the Priority of Discovery of the Use of Gallic Acid in Photography’ [dated 24 June 1854],
Notes & Queries, 8 July 1854, Vol. 10 (245), p. 34
The publication of Reade's letter had been announced by the editor in the previous issue, Notes & Queries, 1 July, p.15. Also appeared, 'Communicated by the Author', under the simpler title of 'Letter from the Rev. J. B. Reade to H. Fox Talbot Esq.' in The Photographic Journal, 21 July 1854, Vol 2: No.20, pp. 9-10. Reprinted in The Art Journal, August 1854, Vol 6 (ns), p. 237.

47. ‘Rev. G. D. Reade’ [sic.] [Authorship is uncertain, probably by John Lee of Hartwell House]
‘Account of the Observatory at Hartwell House, by the Rev. G. D. [sic] Reade, was read at the last meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society by Dr. Lee’
Bucks Advertiser and Aylesbury News, 12 August 1854, Vol. 18 (922), p. 2
A cutting from the Bucks Advertiser is also in Dr. Lee’s Astronomy Scrapbook No. 4, Gunther MS 37, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford. There is confusion, not only due to the initials provided for Reade in the Bucks Advertiser, regarding the correct authorship of this paper. Read by Dr John Lee at meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society on 9 June 1854, it was clearly published as ‘An Account of the Observatory at Hartwell House’ by John Lee, Esq., LL.D. FRS in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 9 June 1854, Vol. 14 (No. 8), pp. 215–7. John Lee of Hartwell House was a Vice–President of the Royal Astronomical Society. He was also J. B. Reade’s patron, but there seems no good reason why he should not have written this account himself, which is in the first person both in the Monthly Notices and Bucks Advertiser. In the preceding Monthly Notice, Vol 14 (No. 7, of 12 May 1854), pp. 196–8 (item 44 of this Bibliography), J. B. Reade’s account of his own observatory at Stone vicarage (one mile from Hartwell) had just been published. And before that, in the Monthly Notices of 10 March 1854 (Vol 14 (No. 5), pp. 161-3) had appeared ‘An account of the Hartwell Rectory Observatory’ by the Rev. C. Lowndes. The printing of the name of Reade at the head of this article in the Bucks Advertiser cannot be explained to entirely justify it as an article by Reade absolutely suitable to appear in this Bibliography. However, even if it cannot be explained, it also cannot yet be explained away. Thus it must be here counted as item 47 of this Bibliography, for conceivably Reade (with his close association with Hartwell) might have partly drafted the article.

48a. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On Photographs of the Moon and of the Sun,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1854, Part 2, pp. 10–12
After discussing a daguerreotype of the moon taken by Bond in USA, and two calotypes by H. Pollock, Reade reports how a group of Astronomers, inc himself, at Rev. Craig’s telescope at Wandsworth used collodion negatives prepared by Prout and printed by Dr. Diamond

48b., On Photographs of the Moon and of the Sun,
The Athenæum, 14 October 1854, Vol., pp. 1240–1
The Athenæum report has an additional first paragraph. See also The Art Journal, 1854, Vol. 6, p.368

49. Rev. Mr. Reade,
J. B. Reade’s evidence given in an unsigned report of the photographic patent trial of ‘Talbot v. Laroche’,
Journal of the Photographic Society (London), 21 December 1854, Vol. 2 (25), pp. 84–95
Reade’s evidence is quoted on pp. 91–2. The Journal of the Photographic Society was the only publication providing verbatum text of the evidence given by the witnesses at the hearing in the Court of Common Pleas. For other reports and commentaries see items [items in Part 2 of bibliography]

50. J. B. Reade,
Four letters on the preparation of ‘Bromo–iodide of Silver’:
50.1 Notes & Queries, 9 December 1854, Vol. 10 (267), p. 472
50.2 Notes & Queries, 20 January 1855, Vol. 11 (273), p. 51
50.3 Notes & Queries, 17 February 1855, Vol. 11 (277), p. 130
50.4 Notes & Queries, 24 March 1855, Vol. 11 (282), pp.230–1

51. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On the Use of Gutta Percha as a Substitute for Glass in the practice of Photography,
Journal of the Photographic Society (London), 21 November 1855, Vol. 2, pp. 253–5
Reade carried out the experiments with Gutta Percha with Dr John Millar, Superintendant of the County Asylum close to Stone Vicarage. Reade had shown some specimens to F. S. Archer. Paper read at meeting of 1 November 1855. See also pp. 262, 266–8 and 281.

52. ‘Chairman’ [JBR],
Discussion on theory of silver forming organic combination with paper,
Journal of the Photographic Society (London), 21 March 1856, Vol. 3, pp. 5–6
Reade chaired the Photographic Society meeting of 6 March 1856 which was devoted to discussion (particularly by Thomas Malone) of a paper by T. F. Hardwich on the ‘Action of Sulphur upon positive prints’ read at the previous meeting, Vol.2, 304–7

53. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 14 November 1856 from Rev J. B. Reade to Richard Owen,
British Museum (Natural History), London. Owen Correspondence, Vol 22, ff. 184–5, 14 November 1856, Vol. 22, pp. ff.184–5
Concerns engraving of a magnified image of a lamna tooth, drawn by Lens Aldous from a photomicrograph taken by Reade in 1839, published by Owen in his Odontography (1840). An unsigned drawing of the tooth exists in the Owen Collection of Drawings folio 84.br>

54. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On a new Method of forming Ammonio–Iodides of metals,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1857, Part 2, pp. 55–7
See also item 32 (1847)

55. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On Animal Ammonia, its Formation, Evolution, and Office,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for 1858, Part 2, pp. 65–6
(Sir) B. W. Richardson at the British Association Report for 1856 (Part 2, p.98) and in Coagulation of the Blood (1856) had proposed the solubility of fibrin depended on Ammonia in the blood. Reade supported this, finding Ammonia excreted by skin and breath. Also reported in The Athenæum, 1858, p.480

56. J. B. Reade,
The Waterhouse Diaphragms (letter to the editor dated 18 March 1859 commenting on an earlier letter from H. R. Smyth of Leeds in the journal in January 1859, Vol. 5, pp.137–8),
Journal of the Photographic Society (London), 9 April 1859, Vol. 5, pp. 254–5
Waterhouse had published ‘Diaphragms for a Portrait Combination’, in the Journal of the Photographic Society, 21 July 1858, Vol. 4, 258–9. Reade says ‘Mr Waterhouse described his method to me in the winter of 1856, and then wished me to take his camera to London to be suitably fitted up.’

57a. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
On a New [Single] Hemispherical Condenser for the Microscope, and its use in illustrating an important principle in [oblique] Microscopic Illumination,
Transactions of the Microscopical Society (Second Series), 1861, Vol. 9, pp. 59–65
Read at meeting of 8 May 1861. Later Reade called this his ‘Single Kettledrum’ to differentiate it from his later modification in 1867 which instead of a single used a double hemispherical lens, his ‘Double–Kettledrum’ – see items 73, 91 and 100

57b. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
Hemispherical condenser for microscopes, illustrating a new principle in [oblique] microscopic illumination,
London International Exhibition of 1862: Catalogue, Class 13 (Philosophical Instruments), p.34, Exhibit No. 2948, with illustration.
Text describes ‘a new arangement of stops, applicable to all condensers, for regulating the number, position, and magnitude of transmitted pencils of oblique light’. Also Jurors Report (1863), class 13, pp. 22 and 24 mentions Reade’s method

58. Rev. J. B. Reade,
‘The Early History of Photography’, Letter ‘From the Rev. J. B. Reade to Lyndon Smith Esq. ... Dec. 16, 1859’,
British Journal of Photography, 1 March 1862, Vol. 9, pp. 79–80
This letter was of great significant in promoting Reade as discoverer of the photographic process, especially as it was reprinted almost in full in item 81 and in John Werge’s influential Evolution of Photography (1890), 15–21. With related correspondence

59. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Letter ‘From the Rev. J. B. Reade to George Shadbolt [Editor, British Journal of Photography]... Feb. 24, 1862’,
British Journal of Photography, 1 March 1862, Vol. 9, p. 80
This letter to the editor of the British Journal of Photography on the occasion when Reade’s letter to L. Smith (see preceding item) was setup for printing in 1862 does add some other reminiscences about his first photography.

60. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
On the Nature, Properties, and Laws of Polarized Light,
Leeds Intelligencer, 8 March 1862, Vol. 109 (2976), p. 8
A lecture given on Tuesday 4 March 1862 to the Leeds Philosophical Society in the Stock Exchange Hall, Leeds, ‘assisted in a series of brilliant illustrative experiments by Dr. John Millar, of London and Mr. W. Milner, Wakefield House of Correction.’

61. J. B. Reade,
Letter from J. B. Reade to Sir David Brewster, dated Ellesbro’ Rectory, Tring, April 2, 1862,
published in The Reades of Blackwood Hill, by A. L. Reade, limited edition of 350 copies privately printed for the author by Spottiswoode: London 1906, p. 97
Present survival of the autograph letter is not known. Reade writes about the recent publication of his letter to L. Smith and his lecture at Leeds,‘you were unable to comply with the request of the Committee, I believe I took your place’. Sent portrait.

62. J. B. Reade,
Letter from J. B. Reade to Sir David Brewster, dated April 12, 1862,
published in The Reades of Blackwood Hill..., by A. L. Reade, Spottiswoode: London 1906, p. 97
In reply to Reade’s earlier letter/s, Brewster had written on 3 April (also on p.97) about W. H. F. Talbot in relation to Brewster’s mention of Reade in North British Review (item 33), sent a copy of Chimenti’s supposed Stereoscopic drawing, and again about Chimenti on 10 April (item , Bibliography Part 2). Reade in turn responds to those subjects.

63. J. B. Reade,
The Chimenti Pictures. Letter to editor of the Photographic Journal dated 7 April 1862, with a P.S. of 11 April,
Photographic Journal, 15 April 1862, Vol. 8, pp. 29–30
A woodcut of a photograph of the drawings sent by Brewster to Reade appeared as a plate in the same issue. Considering if Chimenti [c1554–1640] had intended 2 drawings to be viewed for sterescopic effect, Reade thought ‘the odds in his favour.’

64a. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
Experiments on Photography with Colour,
Advance of Science, British Association Report for the 32nd meeting at Cambridge, 1862, Part 2, pp. 22–23
Reade supposed that due to increasing the amount of iodiser in the collodion when producing glass positives, he ‘happened to obtain unusual traces of colour in photographic portraits’ See also Reade’s later remarks on colour, item 99

64b. Experiments on Photography with Colour,
British Journal of Photography, 15 October 1862, Vol. 9, p. 386
After the text, a dismissive editorial comment: ‘The picture which accompanied this communication was shown to the members present... but in the opinion of the photographers present, the evidences of colour were not of a character to warrant any hope...’

64c. Editorial report of Reade’s ‘Experiments on Photography with Colour’,
Photographic Journal, 15 October 1862, Vol. 8, p.140
Extremely dismissive report: ‘a glass positive, with the warm drab or buff tone which not uncommonly characterizes positives developed with pyrogallic acid, and which by a lively imagination may be regarded as an approximation to a flesh–tint’ [etc]

65. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Undated Letter [c. late 1860–1863] to W. H. Smyth on a double faced brass in Stone Church,
in ‘A word more on the “double–faced” brass in Stone Church’ by W. H. Smyth, Records of Buckinghamshire, 1863, Vol. 2, pp. 321–32
Reade’s letter is on pp. 327–9 within Smyth’s article. Also soon after reprinted in Smyth’s Addenda to the Ædes Hartwellianæ (1864), pp. 228–30

66. Joseph B. Reade,
Letter dated 2 June 1862 to W. H. Smyth commenting on, and providing a photograph of, ‘the Protector’s sword’ at Chequers,
in W. H. Smyth’s Addenda to the Ædes Hartwellianæ, Privately printed: London 1864, p. 243, with an engraving of Reade’s photograph of the Cromwellian sword resting on a chair on p. 244.

67. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Letter dated 9 December 1862 to W. H. Smyth providing a chemical and microscopic analysis of a fragment of a limestone North African Sculpture,
in W. H. Smyth’s Addenda to the Ædes Hartwellianæ, Privately printed: London 1864, p. 191

68. Rev. J. B. Reade,
A method of separating Desmidiæ,
Transactions of the Microscopical Society (2nd series), 1863, Vol. 11, p. 32
As no paper was available to be read at the Microscopical Society meeting on 14 January 1863, Reade spoke of the simple way he separated living desmid from other material into clean water. Report of meeting also in Quarterly.Journal of Microscopical.Science, 1863, Vol.11, p.140

69. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 21 May 1864 to Dr Sharpey, Secretary of the Royal Society,
Royal Society, Miscellaneous Correspondence: MC 7.73,
Reade presents the Royal Society with a bust of William Hey, FRS (1736–1819), Leeds Surgeon. The plaster bust was still listed in The Record of The Royal Society, 4th edition (1940), p. 163, but since the second world war seems no longer at the Society.

70.1 and 70.2     Rev. J. B. Reade,
‘The Origin of Photography’: two abstracts reported in the third person of remarks made by Reade to the editor of the Photographic News,

70.1 Photographic News, 15 September 1865, Vol. 9, p. 444
Reade comments on his use of Gallic Acid recently featured by the editor, G. Wharton Simpson, in his unsigned article ‘The Origin of the Daguerreotype and Talbotype: Discovery [of the Latent Image] by Accident and Induction’ in the 8 September issue, pp.423–5.

70.2. Photographic News, 13 October 1865, Vol. 9, p. 492
A confused text apparently saying Dr. Diamond received from Mr Akerman a copy of Reade’s photograph of a flea on the Sunday [sic] William IV died. These obscurities of the text are discussed by R. D. Wood (1972)

71.  Rev. J. B. Reade,
Letter from R. B. Reade to A. Claudet dated 10 November 1866, with Reade’s additional remarks on Claudet’s system of equalising focus made at Photographic Society meeting on 13 November 1866,
Photographic Journal, 16 November 1866, Vol. 11, pp. 142–3, 146
Reade’s further remarks were made, and letter read, immediately after he himself, on behalf of Claudet (tho present!), had read to the meeting of 13 November Claudet’s paper on ‘... Equalizing the definition of the various Planes of the Figure’, 136–142

72a. Rev. J. B. Reade,
J. B. Reade on the different nature of focus in landscapes and in portraits: discussion at Photographic Society on 11 December 1866,
Photographic Journal, 15 December 1866, Vol. 11, pp. 164–5
Reade’s remarks on the different nature of focus in landscapes and in portraits, on Dallmeyer’s new lens and Claudet’s system of focussing, were his contribution to discussion after a paper on 11 December 1866 by J. H. Dallmeyer ‘On a New Portrait Lens’

72b. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Rev. J. B. Reade on depth of focus of lenses and the eye: discussion at meeting of the Photographic Society on 8 January 1867,
Photographic Journal, 15 January 1867, Vol. 11, pp. 181–2
Remarks on coma in lenses, diffusion of focus and depth of focus of lenses, aperture and depth of focus of the eye, after Claudet’s ‘Observations on Mr. Dallmeyer’s Paper’ had been read by Reade for Claudet at Photographic Society meeting of 8 January 1867

73. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
On a Double Hemispherical Condensor for the Microscope,
Transactions of the Royal Microscopical Society (second series), 1867, Vol. 15, pp. 3–6
Read at 12 December 1866 meeting of the now Royal Microscopical Society – as Reade indicates, the Society had just been incorporated by Royal Charter. This ‘Double Kettledrum’ is a two lens modification of his single lens Condenser of 1861, see item 57. Both of these "valuable" Condensers were briefly mentioned in Lionel S. Beale, How to Work with the Microscope, 4th edition, London 1868, pp. 24–5

74. J. B. Reade,
Letter dated 27 April 1867 to J. B. Sheppard on ‘polychromatic infusorial water’, inserted in Sheppard’s ‘On an Example of the Production of a Colour possessing Remarkable Qualities by the Action of Monads... upon Organised substances.’,
Transactions of the Royal Microscopical Society (second series), 1867, Vol. 15, pp. 66–68
Sheppard’s paper on pp. 64–71 was communicated by Reade to the 8 May 1867 meeting of the RMS. The specimen collected by Sheppard from a spring in Kent had also been exhibited by Reade at a soireé on 24 April and a spectro analysis was made by H. C. Sorby and J. Browning (John Browning, ‘Notes on the Spectra of the Dichroic Fluid described in the above paper’, pp. 71–2, states ‘The Rev. J. B. Reade was with me when I made the experiments I have described, and kindly verified the results’). See comments on Sheppard’s paper and on Reade’s letter made by E. Ray Lancaster in a letter to editor ‘On the Action of Monads in producing colouring matter’, Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science (new series), 1867, Vol. 7, pp. 283–4. Lancaster also refers to a relevant review of ‘Researches on the Physiology of the Phycochromacea and Florideae’ by a German researcher, F. Cohn, in Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, 1867, Vol. 7 (ns), 209–12. Lionel S. Beale in How to Work with the Microscope, 4th edition, London 1868, pp. 340–1 set out the main points of the discussion. Reade made further remarks on the subject in Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1870, Vol. 3, p. 262; in his President’s Address 1870 (Item 96, pp.122–3); and Items 104–105

75. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Chairman’s remarks on adjustment of lenses for focus–equalization, at meeting of Photographic Society on 14 May 1867 during discussion after paper by A. Claudet ‘On a self–acting Focus equaliizer’,
Photographic Journal, 16 May 1867, Vol. 12, pp. 37–8
These remarks continue the theme of Items 71 and 72

76. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Chairman’s remarks on carbon prints, at meeting of Photographic Society on 14 May 1867 during discussion after paper by V. Blanchard ‘On the best means of rendering Silver prints permanent’,
Photographic Journal, 16 May 1867, Vol. 12, pp. 41–2
When V. Blanchard offered to demonstrate at this meeting to subject his collodion coated prints to Sulphide of Ammonia, Reade stalled him by quoting a couplet from a poem by W. Cowper ‘The sight’s enough, who needs to smell a beau –... a raree show?’

77. J. B. Reade,
Letter to Right Hon Benjamin Disraeli dated 10 June 1867 suggesting V. Blanchard’s method of making silver prints permanent by varnishing with collodion might also protect from pollution the Frescoes in Houses of Parliament,
Photographic Journal, 15 June 1867, Vol. 12, p. 55
Written by Reade on behalf of the Council of Photographic Society suggesting V. Blanchard’s method of preserving silver prints from pollution by coating with collodion might be applicable to protection of Frescoes in Houses of Parliament.

78.1. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Chairman’s remarks on lens flare and his Solid Eyepiece in Astronomy at meeting of Photographic Society on 11 June 1867, during discussion after paper by J. H. Dallmeyer ‘On the cause of the central spot, or ldquo;Flare” in Photographic Lenses’,
Photographic Journal, 15 June 1867, Vol. 12, p. 55
Commented that he had solved the problem of lens ‘flare’ by designing his ‘solid eyepiece’ filled with water between the lenses, exhibited at the Exhibition of 1851, see item 42

78.2. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Chairman’s very brief announcement at Photographic Society meeting of 11 June 1867 of a forthcoming soirée, suggesting ‘contributions of their lady friends, many...eminent in the photographic art’,
Photographic Journal, 15 June 1867, Vol. 12, pp. 55–6
Soirée to be held in November: ‘He thought that they might invite the contributions of their lady friends, many of whom had rendered themselves very eminent in the photographic art.’

79. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Chairman’s brief remarks at meeting of the Photographic Society of 10 December 1867 on the late Sir Frederick Pollock (President of the Society and Lord Chief Justice) and the truthfulness of photographic representation.,
Photographic Journal, 17 Decermber 1867, Vol. 12 (188), pp. 47–8
The late president once said ‘both lawyers and artists obtained their living by colouring the facts’. Now Gentlemen,said Reade,‘the great praise of photography is that it does not colour the fact; it gives a true and faithful, and accurate representation’

80. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,
Chairman’s remarks at meeting of the Photographic Society of 10 December 1867 on (a) advances in Photography: discovery of the latent image (b) present attitude of public to Photography.,
Photographic Journal, 17 Decermber 1867, Vol. 12 (188), p. 152
‘the first most important step, that which converted photography from a baby to a man, was the discovery of the latent image and its development. To Fox Talbot belonged the enduring honour of making this substantial advance in the art.’ See also item 81

81a. J. B. Reade,
Who discovered the Latent Image?: letter dated 31 January 1868 to editor of the British Journal of Photography,
British Journal of Photography, 7 February 1868, Vol. 15, pp. 60–61
Reade was responding to M. Carey Lea, regular BJP columnist in Philadelphia, who in the British Journal of Photography of 31 January, p. 43, had expressed surprise at a report (item80) of Reade assigning to Talbot the discovery of the Latent Image. Provides a long quote from item 58

81b. J. B. Reade’s letter ‘Who discovered the Latent Image?’, reprinted in The Photographic Journal, with an introductory comment by the editor Dr. H. Diamond,
Photographic Journal, 16 March 1868, Vol. 13, pp. 15–17
The Photographic Journal editors (Dr. Diamond & J. Spiller) introduce the letter with ‘Dr Diamond would have confirmed Mr. Reade’s ... use of galllic acid, had his summons to be a witness in... Talbot v. Laroche been followed by his being called into the witness box’

82. Rev. J. B. Reade,
On the Separation of the Rays of Heat from the Rays of Light in Solar and Oxyhydrogen Gas Microscopes,
British Journal of Photography Almanac for 1868, pp. 85–86
Recalls early work (item 2). When George Shadbolt, the editor of the British Journal of Photography, wrote an obituary of Reade in December 1870 he recalled how he had suggested to Reade to write this reminiscence of his early work, reprinting it with the obituary (British Journal of Photography, 16 Dec 1870, pp. 588–90).

83.1 and 83.2. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
Chairman’s remarks at the Photographic Society meeting of 10 March 1868:
83.1   in appreciation of the late Sir David Brewster and his ideas on the value of photography and education in Science.,
Photographic Journal, 16 March 1868, Vol. 13, pp. 2–3
These remarks by Reade (but not the text of Brewster’s address) were also reported in British Journal of Photography, 13 March, Vol. 15, p.127
83.2   The Photographic Society needs more amateurs, and members to receive presentation prints (including one in memoriam of A. Claudet taken by topaz lens),
Photographic Journal, 16 March 1868, Vol. 13, p.10

84. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Chairman’s short comment at 11 March 1868 meeting of the Royal Microscopical Society, relating to inaccuracies in some authors’ papers on algae colouring of the Red Sea.,
Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, 1868, Vol. 8, pp. 116–7
Alluded to value of a paper read at meeting as a record of personal and accurate observations of the author, but ‘Some who have written largely on the subject are indebted entirely to the observations of others... cemented with... imagination paste’.

85. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,
On the Coffee Process, &c.[Tannates and Ammonia],
British Journal of Photography, 18 September 1868, Vol. 15, pp. 444–5
Letter dated 4 September, with a P.S. of 10 September 1868

86. J. B. R.,
Obituary of Antoine François Jean Claudet (1797–1867),
Proceedings of the Royal Society, 18 June 1868 to 17 June 1869, Vol. 17, pp. lxxxv–vii

87. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Remarks at the Photographic Society meeting of 8 December 1868, on previous use of a yellow glass filter to control exposure when obtaining photographs of Sun through large telescope at Wandsworth,
Photographic Journal, 11 December 1868, Vol. 13, p. 187
A slightly different version in the third person of these remarks also appeared in report of the meeting in British Journal of Photography, 11 December 1868, Vol. 15. p. 594

88. J. B. Reade/ George Shadbolt,
Account by editor of J. B. Reade’s method of preparing Ammonio–Iodates for iodising Collodion plates and ammonio–periodate of Gold for gold toning of prints,
British Journal of Photography Almanac for 1869, pp. 41–43
Account begins: ‘In the beginning of last summer, the Rev. J. B. Reade, FRS and I were conversing upon the influences that special Iodides and bromides excercise over collodion. He told me...’

89. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Chairman’s brief remarks on artists and Combination Printing, at meeting of Photographic Society on 12 January 1869 after a paper by N. K. Cherrill on the subject,
Photographic Journal, 1869, Vol. 13, p. 208

90.1. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Remarks as President and chairman of meeting of 10 March 1869 of the Royal Microscopical Society, setting out the differences, as found by Sir David Brewster, between the Crystalline Lens of Fish and of Animals,
Monthly Microscopical Journal (Royal Microscopical Society), 1 April 1869, Vol. 1, p.255
Reade became President of the RMS at the AGM of 10 February 1869 (MMJ, Vol 1, pp. 153–4, 193). As President and chairman of the monthly meetings held in March, April and May 1869 he commented on subjects relating to the papers read.

90.2. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Remarks as the President and Chairman of the meeting of 14 April 1869 of the Royal Microscopical Society recalling comment about Bishop Berkeley’s theory of matter,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 May 1869, Vol. 1, p. 318
Dr. Beale thought there was no such thing as ‘fortuitous concourse of elements making living forms’, which reminded Reade of Dr. Milner refuting Bishop Berkeley’s theory of matter, ‘It contradicts common sense, and there must be great nonsense somewhere’

90.3. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Remarks as the President and Chairman of the meeting of 12 May 1869 of the Royal Microscopical Society describing his method of microscopic examination of tubes or pseudo–tracheæ in the proboscis of Blow Fly,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 June 1869, Vol. 1, pp. 373–4
First recalling observations of tubes in proboscis of blood–sucking flies shown to meeting in 1837, then described his recent similar examinations

91. Rev. J. B. Reade,
Addition to the ‘Kettledrum’ double hemispherical condenser,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 June 1869, Vol. 1, pp. 374–5
At the RMS meeting of 12 May 1869, ‘the President [JBR] then said that at Mr Lee’s request he would describe a small but effective addition he had just made to the Kettledrum or double hemispherical condensor ... the super–position of a third lens ...’. See also items 57, 73 and 100

92a. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S.,President of the Royal Microscopical Society,
On the Diatom Prism, and the True Form of Diatom Markings,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 July 1869, Vol. 2, pp. 5–11
Paper read at RMS meeting of 9 June 1869. Reade was unable to take part in the short discussion at the meeting which was one reason why he wrote the following Postscript giving information on the additional work he had done during six weeks after the reading.

92b. Rev. J. B. Reade, M.A., F.R.S., President of the Royal Microscopical Society,
On the Microscope Prism, and the Structure of the Podura Scale; being a Postscript to the Paper ‘On the Diatom Prism and Diatom Markings...’,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 August 1869, Vol. 2, pp. 79–84
This ‘Postscript’ communication is undated but itself has a P.S. of July 21. Samuel Highley, a Microscope Maker in Great Portland Street, London, in May made a triple lens version of the ‘Kettledrum’ condensor as mentioned by Reade at the 12 May meeting of the RMS (see item 91). Reade wrote a note (c) to Highley on 22 May that he had ‘just hit upon another and different mode of illumination’. It was a way of obtaining oblique transmitted illumination, using a prism which could be rotated under the microscope specimen stage. Reade had merely used rubber bands but Highley not only immediately manufactured a brass substage fitting for the rectangular prism, but also wrote a two–part article ‘On an important discovery in Microscopic Illumination; Reade’s Microscope Prism’ which very quickly appeared (after the reading of Reade’s first paper #92a, but before its publication) in The Illustrated Photographer, 25 June and 9 July 1869 and within a few weeks Highley privately published a slightly revised version as a 24 page pamphlet, Reade’s Prism for Microscope Illumination. Reade’s technique also soon featured in two anon. editorial articles in The Student and Intellectual Observer, August and September 1869, Vol 4, pp. 62–3, 128–9. Later, F. W. Griffin commented on practical problems in fitting Reade’s Prism under the different thicknesses of stages on microscopes of different manufacture: ‘On the Mounting of the Diatom–prism’, Monthly Microscope Journal, January 1871, Vol 5, 24-5

92c. J. B. Reade,
Short letter to Samuel Highley dated Bishopsbourne Rectory, May 22nd and May 28th, 1869,
in Samuel Highley, ‘On an important discovery in Microscopic Illumination’, The Illustrated Photographer, 25 June 1869, Vol. 2, p. 301, and in Highley’s booklet, Reade’s Prism for Microscope Illumination., London: privately published 1869, p. 6.
Reade’s short note of 22 May to Highley says only that ‘I have just hit upon another and different mode of illumination, cheaper certainly than the kettle–drum, shall I also say better!...’ He goes on to speak of the results of using this mode, but the device is not mentioned here. It is in Highley’s own text following the letter that explains this illumination is obtained with a sub–stage Prism.

93. J. B. Reade,
Account of Two Meteors seen at Bishopsbourne, in a letter [dated October 20, 1869] to J. Glaisher, F. R. S.’,
Proceedings of the Meteorological Society, November 1869, Vol. 5, pp. 21–22
Describes a most splendid meteor seen from his Rectory at Bishopsbourne, Kent, on 1 October 1869, as well as another of 11 October which had been previously reported as close to Sheffield in The Standard of 16 October 1869

[ J. B. Reade, October-December 1869: Four letters to G. C. Wallich, see item 108 ]

94. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S., President, in the chair,
As President and chairman of Royal Microscopical Society meeting of 13 October 1869, very brief remarks (after a paper ‘Plants of the Coal–measures’ by Carruthers) on his own early experiments of microincineration of plants,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 November 1869, Vol. 2, p. 282
As President, Reade was chairman of the monthly meetings of the Royal Microscopical Society, and commented on the subject of papers read in October, November and December 1869

95a. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S., President, in the chair,
Remarks on the nature of the ‘Podura’ scale, made as President and chairman of meetings of the Royal Microscopical Society held on 13 October, [10 November, 8 December 1869, and 11 May 1870],
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 November 1869, Vol. 2, p. 281
Scales from the ‘Podura’ (Lepidocyrtus curvicollis) insect used as a test of microscope resolution and lens aberrations, were much discussed at this period at the RMS in relation to a paper communicated in October 1869 by Dr. G. W. Royston Pigott, see Monthly Microscopical Journal,Vol.2, pp. 295–305 and Vol 3, pp. 13–14. Pigott used a water–immersion lens, a point well discussed by F. H. Wenham ‘Remarks on High–Power definition’, Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 June 1870, Vol. 3, pp.300–5. On p. 300 Wenham comments regarding the ‘bead’ structure of the Podura ‘from the partial acquiescence conceded by our respected President [Reade], I infer that this structure finds credence amongst a number who interest themselves in such nvestigations...’. See also Reade’s conclusions in his Presidential Address (item 96, pp.124–5) and in item 100.

95b. Remarks on the nature of the ‘Podura’ scale, made as President and chairman of meeting of the Royal Microscopical Society held on 10 November 1869,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 December 1869, Vol. 2, pp. 333–4

95c. Remarks on the nature of the ‘Podura’ scale, made as President and chairman of meeting of the Royal Microscopical Society held on 8 December 1869,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 January 1870, Vol. 3, pp. 52–53

95d. Remarks on the nature of the ‘Podura’ scale, made as President and chairman of meeting of the Royal Microscopical Society held on 11 May 1870,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 June 1870, Vol. 3, pp. 325–6
In addition, a letter (p.324) was read from J. J. Woodward, Washington, regarding Pigott’s papers on the Podura scale, says that the fact the Dr. Pigott ‘appears to have convinced so distinguished a microscopist as the Rev J. B. Reade, makes me inclined to caution...’

96. Rev J. B. Reade,
The President’s Address (Delivered before the Royal Microscopical Society, February 9, 1870.),
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 March 1870, Vol. 3, pp. 113–133
This Address, as usual, reviews the activities of the past year (pp.119–29), but as Reade was a founder member of the original society in 1839 it does (on pp.113–7, 129–32) have more of a historical character, and of very considerable influence on later historians of the RMS.

97a. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 17 February 1870 to Dr. Sharpey, Secretary of The Royal Society, concerning presentation to the Royal Microscopical Society of his set of Philosophical Transactions,
Royal Society. Miscellaneous Correspondence MC 9.34,
Has presented his set of Philosophical Transactions to the Royal Microscopical Society [see his Presidential Address to RMS, item 96]. Complete from 1665 except for ten parts, so can the Royal Society see their way to making up this deficiency?

97b. J. B. Reade,
Autograph letter dated 28 February 1870 to Dr. Sharpey, Secretary of The Royal Society, thanking the Royal Society for complying with his request for providing missing parts of Philosophical Transactions,
Royal Society. Miscellaneous Correspondence MC 9.42,
According to the Royal Microscopical Society’s Monthly Microscopical Journal, January to June 1870, Vol. 3, pp. 167, 211 and 215, the Royal Society donated to the RMS five volumes of the Philosophical Transactions of the years 1813, 1836, 1837, 1838 and 1843.

98. J. B. R.,
Mulgrave Old Castle, verse of eight lines by J. B. R,
Photographic Journal, 15 March 1870, Vol. 15, p. 2
After inspecting photographic views of Whitby by J. Waller exhibited at the 8 March 1870 meeting of the Photographic Society, Reade asked the editor to insert these lines of verse by himself into the Photographic Journal

99a. Rev J. B. Reade,
Remarks on the laws of light relating to his belief that photographs in colour were not impossible, as contribution to discussion at meeting of the Photographic Society held on 8 March 1870,
Photographic Journal, 15 March 1870, Vol. 15, p. 5
When chairman (James Glaisher) said the laws of light would have to be changed before it would be possible to obtain photographs in colour, Reade countered that he did not find the word ‘impossible’ in his vocabulary. Recalled his experiments in 1862, item 64

99b. A slightly different report in the British Journal of Photography of Reade’s remarks that photographs in colour were not impossible, at meeting of the Photographic Society held on 8 March 1870,
British Journal of Photography, 11 March 1870, Vol. 17, pp. 115
The British Journal of Photography here provided a differently worded report of the 8 March meeting of the Photographic Society, and also Reade’s remark about Colour photographs not being impossible was considered in an editorial on pp. 108–9

100. Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S., P.R.M.S.,
Microscopic Test Objects under parallel light and corrected powers,
Popular Science Review, 1870, Vol. 9, pp. 138–148
This article can be considered the Reverend Reade’s last hymn to the microscope, more especially to the condenser, the illuminating apparatus, so long of central interest to him. Plate 58 was by Dr. Pigott who supplied a long description on pp.149–50

101. Rev J. B. Reade,
Croydon Microscopic [sic] Club.
[Report of Reade’s talk to first meeting of the Croydon Microscopical Club on the advantages which the microscope might confer on every cultivator of the soil],
The Lancet, 23 April 1870, p. 605.
This talk, seemingly aimed at the members of the Croydon Farmers Club in the audience, was reprinted in Monthly Microscopical Journal, January to June 1870, Vol. 3, pp. 255–6, and slightly different version in [First Report of the]Proceedings of the Croydon Microscopical Club, 1871, pp.12–14

102. Rev J. B. Reade,
Remarks on resolving Norbert’s Test plate rulings and high power definition, made as President and chairman of meetings of the Royal Microscopical Society held on 11 May 1870,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 June 1870, Vol. 3, p. 327
Because of a letter from Charles Stodder of Boston, Reade was correcting a comment made in his Presidential Address (see item 96) that Dr J. J. Woodward was the only observer who had resolved Norbert’s 19th band of 112,688 lines to the inch, for Stodder in Quarterly Journal of the Microscopical Society of July 1868 had said the band was visible with an immersion lens. After mentioning that Woodward ‘had thrown some doubt as to the nature of the lines seen but not counted by Mr. Stodder’, Reade added the real point was such observations provided ‘a strong fact in favour of the immersion system’.

103. Rev J. B. Reade,
On use of high power objective lenses on Stephenson’s binocular microscope, brief remarks made as President and chairman of meeting of the Royal Microscopical Society held on 8 June 1870,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 July 1870, Vol. 4, p. 56

104. The late Rev. J. B. Reade, F.R.S.,P.R.M.S.,
Note on Fluorescence v. Pseudo–Dichroism,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 January 1871, Vol. 5, pp. 1–2
Letter dated 7 November 1870 at Bishopsbourne Rectory, read at Royal Microscopical Society meeting of 9 November 1870, on an experiment with mixture of opaque vermilion in transparent indigo water–colour simulating colour phenomena of Phycocyan algæ. See also item 74, and comments appended to the listing of that item in this Bibliography.

105. J. B. Reade,
Letter to T. Charters White, dated at Bishopsbourne Rectory 19 November 1870, commenting on pseudo–dichroism with regard to White’s specimen of Pond Water,
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 1 February 1871, Vol. 5, p. 54
White had sent to Reade some observations on a specimen of water collected from the Round Pond in Kensington Gardens, London. Reade’s letter of 19 November 1870 comments on pseudo–dichroism and suggests White should send a note about the specimen to the Microscopical Journal. Indeed the letter accompanies the publication of Dr White’s observations, ‘The Development of Phycocyan’ (read at the Royal Microscopical Society on 11 January 1871, MMJ, Vol. 5, pp.53–4). Reade’s letter has a final comment: ‘I am so weak that a friend writes for me’. He died 23 days later

106. Joseph Bancroft Reade,
Last Will and Testament, dated 6 October 1870,
Principal Registry of the Family Division (Probate) of the High Court of Justice, London: Will 127/1871.
Executors John Millar and William Milner Fawcett. Probate proved at London 7 February 1871. In the Calendar of Grants of Probate, Principal Registry, London, the entry for Will 127/1871 states ‘Effects under £800. Resworn June 1886 under £2,000’

Items 107–110. Reserved for any writings of J. B. Reade found after Part 1 of this bibliography was compiled in the 1970s.

107. J. B. Reade, Seven autograph letters to Jabez Hogg, 1868-1870
Brotherton Library, Leeds. Ref. BC Misc. Letters 2 REA
Through February 1868 to November 1870 these letters were written to Jabez Hogg (1817-1899), Secretary of the Royal Microscopical Society. The four letters of 1870 were written by Reade in the last three painful months of his life - he was indeed still mindful of his official capacity of President of the RMS, but they are very personal and moving letters.

108. J. B. Reade, Four autograph letters to George C. Wallich, Oct-Dec 1869
Scientific Correspondence of G. C. Wallich: Natural History Museum, London. Ref. L MSS WAL C/1
108.1 Autograph letter dated 8 October 1869 at Bishopsbourne to G. C. Wallich, asking him not to resign from RMS.
108.2 Autograph letter dated 14 October 1869 at Bethnal House to G. C. Wallich, reassuring him that RMS Council value his work.
108.3 Autograph letter dated 27 November 1869 at Bishopsbourne to G. C. Wallich, regretting Wallich's research was neglected in a Times report of a paper by Dr. W. B. Carpenter.
108.4 Autograph letter dated 16 December 1869 at Bishopsbourne to G. C. Wallich, trying to heal Wallich's hurt feelings on perceived injustice from Dr. Carpenter.
Through October to December 1869 these four letters were written to G. C. Wallich (1815-1899) by Reade in his position as President of the Royal Microscopical Society. Reade wrote on 14 October 1869, "I see very clearly that you have been robbed of your fair fame & your early & valued labours have by some been most unjustly ignored". Reade tried to console Wallich in these letters. Wallich had been naturalist on HM Bulldog surveying the north Atlantic in 1860. He was particularly hurt that his discovery and ideas about micro organisms on the deep sea bed were being ignored in current writings by Dr. Carpenter. These letters were amongst a collection purchased in 1985 from a Wallich descendant by the Natural History Museum, London: Scientific Correspondence of G. C. Wallich, Ref. L MSS WAL C/1. Also in that collection are some other earlier letters relating to the same subject, see Wallich's copy letter to Dr. Carpenter dated 18 Nov 1868, and (in folder 'Royal Microscopical Society') letter from Jabez Hogg dated 12 Dec 1868, and letter from H. Davies dated Oct 1868.

109 Revd J. B. Reade,
Observations on the Aurora Borealis of 24 October [1847]
Bucks Herald (Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire), 30 October 1847

110   Reserved for any other writing of J. B. Reade found after Part 1 of this bibliography was revised in the 1990s. The unpublished Part II (writings about Reade) begins with item No. 111.
 
 


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Index of Journals and MSS Collections
  The reference is to Item numbers.

Advance of Science, British Association Reports, 6, 20, 30, 32, 39, 48a, 54, 55, 64a
Ædes Hartwellianæ, by W. H. Smyth (1864), 38, 66, 67
Annals of Electricity, 1
Annals of Natural History, 10, 12
Annals and Magazine of Natural History [continuation of the above], 30
Archæological Journal, 41
Archæologia, 41
Art Journal, The, 46, 48b
Athenæum, 5b, 21, 22a, 22b, 37, 39, 48b, 55

British Journal of Photography, 58, 59, 64b, 81, 83.1, 85, 87, 99b
British Journal of Photography Almanac, 82, 88
Brotherton Library, Leeds, 107
Bucks Advertiser and Aylesbury News, 47
Bucks Herald (Aylesbury), 109

Exhibition of 1851: Reports by the Juries, 42, 43
Exhibition of 1862: Catalogue, 57b

Hamilton Reade Collection, 23
Hartwell MSS (Buckinghamshire Record Office), 24, 26, 27, 34, 35, 36a, 36b, 38, 40
Humphreys’s Journal of the Daguerreotype and Photographic Arts (New York, 1854), 45, 46
Illustrated Photographer, 92c
Journal of the Photographic Society (London), 49, 51, 52, 56

Lacock Abbey Collection, 16
Lancet, 101
Leeds Intelligencer, 60

Mechanics’ Magazine, 31
Microscopical Journal and Structural Record, 19, 21
Microscopical Society of London: ‘Minutes of Ordinary and Annual Meetings, 1840 – June 1868’, 21, 22
Monthly Microscopical Journal, 90, 91, 92, 94, 95, 96,
101, 102, 103, 104, 105
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 28, 37, 44, 47
MSS, 2b, 11b, 14, 15, 16, 17b, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 34,
          35, 36a, 36b, 38, 40, 53, 69, 97a, 97b, 107, 108

Natural History Museum, London, 53, 108
North British Review, 33
Notes & Queries, 45, 46, 50
Numismatic Chronicle, 13
Numismatic Journal, 5a
Owen Correspondence at British Museum (Natural History), 53

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 96, 97
Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, 2a, 3, 4, 7, 8, 45
Photographic Journal, 46, 49, 63, 64c, 71, 72, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81b,
          83, 87, 89, 98, 99a   (see also Journal of the Photographic Society)
Photographic News, 70
Phytologist, 22b
Popular Science Review, 100
Proceedings of the Croydon Microscopical Club [First Report], 101
Proc. Meteorological Society, 93
Proc. Royal Society, 2a, 11a, 17a, 86
Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, 68, 74, 84, 96

Reades of Blackwood Hill by A. L. Reade, 61, 62
Records of Buckinghamshire, 65
Report of the Third [and Fourth] Anniversary Meeting of
      the Microscopical Society of London
, 22a, 22b
Royal Photographic Society Collection, 15
Royal Society, Archives, 2b, 11b, 14, 17b, 69, 97a, 97b

Times, The (London), 18, 25
Transactions Microscopical Society, 19, 29, 57a, 68, 96
Transactions Royal Microscopical Society (2nd series), 73, 74, 96
Wallich Collection, BM (Nat.Hist), 108
Zoologist, 29
 

General Index
  (The reference is to Item numbers)

Advancement of Science, see British Association
Affidavits, 46
Agriculture, 20, 21
Airy, G. B., 17b
Akerman, J. Y., 40, 41, 58, 70.2
Albumen, 74, 105
Aldous, Lens, 53, 82, 85, 96
Algae, 68, 74, 84, 92, 100, 104, 105
Ammonia, 21, 22, 54, 55, 85, 101
Ammonio–Iodides, 54, 88
Ammonio–Iodide of Gold, 32, 88
Animals, 4
Archer, F. S., 51
Archæology, 5, 13, 38, 41
Artists, 89
Ashes of plants, 4
Astronomy, 25, 28, 35, 37, 39, 42, 44, 47, 48, 78.1, 93, 109
Asylum (Bucks), 36, 41, 101
Asylum Act 8 & 9 Vic., 36b
Aurora Borealis, 109
Awdrey, Sir John, 62

Band of Hope, 85
Beale, Dr. Lionel, 90.2
Beck, 92b
Beer, 85
Berkeley, Bishop, 90.2
Berkeley’s theory of matter, 92a
Bethnal House, 108.2, 108.3
Biela’s Comet, 28.4, 28.5
Biot, J–B., 8
Bird, Golding, 11
Bishop of Oxford, 36a
Bishopsbourne (Kent), 93, 106
Blanchard, V., 76, 77
Blood, 55
Blow Fly, 90.3
Bond, W. C., 48
Bowerbank, J. S., 10, 12, 90.3, 96
Brande, W. T., 56
Brande’s i>Chemistry, 50d
Brandon, G. D., 41
Brasses (Church), 65
Brayley, E. W., 16, 33, 45, 46, 49, 58
Brewster, Sir David, 40, 60, 61, 62, 63, 78.1, 83.1, 90.1

British Association, Advancement of Science, 6, 7, 88
British Journal of Photography, 61
Bromide, 50, 64
Bromo–iodide of Silver, 50
Brown, Robert, 8, 19
Browning, John, 74
Bucks Architectural and Archæological Society, 35
Burlington House, London, 96

Calorific rays, 2, 82
Calotype, 50
Camera obscura, 16, 33
Carbon prints, 76
Carbonization, 94
Carpenter, Dr. W. B., 63, 108.3, 108.4
Carrots, 10
Carruthers, Mr, 94
Carter, C. (son of the following G. Carter), 44
Carter, G. (carpenter at Stone), 44
Cereal plants, 94
Chalk, The, 9, 29
Chancellor of the Exchequer (Disraeli), 77
Chemistry, 7, 20, 21, 22, 24, 31, 32, 43, 54, 55, 67, 85, 88
Chequers, 66
Cherrill, Mr., 75, 76, 77
Cherrill, N. K., 89
Chesterfield (Lord), 34
Chicago (see Microscopical Society <
of Illinois), 96
Chimenti, Jacopo [1554–1640?], drawing, 61, 62, 63
Chlorophyll, 74
Cilia, 30
Clapeyron, B. P. E., on Heat, 3
Clark. G. (Carpenter at Stone), 47
Claudet, Antoine, 71, 72a, 75, 83.2
Claudet, A., his obituary by Reade, 86
Clock, 26
Coal, 6, 8
Coffee process (tannin and Ammonia
      in Photographic process), 85
Cohn, F., 74, 104
Coin Moulds, 5, 13
Collodion, 51, 64
Collodion coating (as a varnish), 76, 77
Collodion plates, 87, 88
Colour, 64, 74, 99
Combination printing of photographs, 89
Comets, 25, 28
Condenser, see Microscope
‘Conversation’ (W. Cowper’s poem), 76
Court of Common Pleas, 49
Cowper, William, his poem ‘Conversation’, 76
Craig, Mr. (his telescope at Wandsworth), 48, 87
Cromwell, Oliver, 66
Crookes, Mr. (at Stone), 40
Croydon Farmers Club, 101
Croydon Microscopic[al] Club, 101

D’Arrest’s Comet, 28.3
Daguerreotype, 48
Dallmeyer, J. H., 71, 72, 75
Dark–ground illumination, see Microscope
Davy, Sir H., 52, 58
Dawes, Mr., 44
De Vico’s Comets, 28.2, 28.6
Desmidiæ, 68
Diamond, Dr. Hugh, 48, 50, 58, 70.2, 81b, 82
Diatom Prism, 92, 108.1
Diatoms, 92, 100
Dichroism, 74, 104, 105
Dicotyledonous plants, 19
Disraeli, Benjamin., 77
Dissenters, 35
Dollond, G., 17b
Donkin, W. F., 44
Dujardin, 100
Dung Heap, 101

Education, 83.1
Ehrenberg, C. G. (1795–1876), 4, 6, 9, 12, 13, 29, 92a
Emigration Fund (at Hartwell, Bucks), 40
England, William, 83.2
Executors of JBR’s Will, 106
Exhibition of 1851, 42, 43
Exhibition of 1862, 57b
Eye, 72b, 90.1
Eye, lens fibres, 90.1
Eyethorpe field (Bucks), 38
Fasel, F. V., 28.7, 36b
Fawcett, William Milner, 105
Faye’s Comet, 25, 28.1
Feathers, 59
Fee Farm Rent Office (London), 34
Fenton, Roger, 53
Fibular, 41
Flea, 15, 16, 33
Flea, drawing of head, 82
Flint, The, 6, 9, 12
Fluorescence, 104
Focus equaliser, see Lenses
Fossils, 5

Gall ink, 31
Gallate of Silver, 16, 33
Gallic acid, 45, 46, 49, 58, 59, 61, 70, <
81, 85
Gardener (at Peckham), 59
Geology, 29, 30, 38, 67
Gillett’s Condenser, 57b
‘Gisbro’ [Guisborough, Yorks], 36a
Glaisher, James. F.R.S., 36b, 42, 93, 99a
Glaisher, John (1819–1846), 28.2, 28.3
Glass positive, 64
Glebe land at Stone, sale, 36
Gloves (leather), 58
Gmelin, 54
Gold toning of photographic prints, 88
Gold, 32, 54
Goring, C. R., 1
Granite, 6, 29
Gravatt, 57a
Green house (at Peckham), 59
Grove, W. R., 46, 49
Guisborough (Yorks), 15, 36a
Gulliver, Prof, 90.1
Gutta Percha, 51

Halifax museum, 66
Hanson of Leeds, 61
Hartwell (Bucks), 38,
Hartwell Observatory, 25, 28.1–28.6, 47
Heat, 2, 3, 37, 39, 82
Hemispherical lenses, 57, 73, 91
Henslow, J. S., 4, 7, 8
Herschel, Sir John, 45, 58
Hey, William (1736–1819) , Bust of, 69
Hey, John, 5
Highley, Samuel, 73, 92c, 96
Historiography, 33, 81a, 81b
Hiver [French Archæologist], 13
Hodgson, Mr [C.J. ?], 45
Hogg, Jabez, 107, 108.4
Hops, 85
Hughes, Jabez, 80
Hunt, Robert, Reade’s letter to (1854), 45, 53
Hutton Low Cross (Yorkshire), 15, 36a
Hyacinth, 7
Hyposulphite [sodium thiosulphate], <
16, 33, 45

Illuminating rays, 37, 39
Illustrations, 9, 12
Immersion lens, see Microscope
Incineration, see micro–incineration
Indigo water colour, 104
Infusion of Galls, 16, 33
Infusoria, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13, 29, 30, 74
Ink, 24, 31, 43
Iodide, 50, 64
Iodine, 43, 54
Iodisation, 88
Isinglass, 14
John Marks Farms (Bucks), 38
Jones, Rymer, 108.4
Jones, T. (Optical instruments), 47
Journals, 97
Journals (RMS), 96

Kettledrum, 57, 73, 91, 92, 100
Kettledrum, double, 73
Kettledrum, single, 57
Kettledrum (addition of third lens), 91
Kimmeridge Clay, 29, 30
Lamna tooth (engraving), 53
Landscapes (Photographic), 72a
Lancaster, E. Ray, 74
Laroche, Silvester, 49
Latent Image, 70.1, 80, 81
Law, 49
Lawyers and artists, they colour facts, 79
Le burns ruins, 99
Lea, M. Carey, 81
Leachman, John, 50
Leather, 58
Lee, Dr. John, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28.1–28.6, 34, 35, 36b, 38, 40, 44, 47
Lee, Henry, 101
Leeds Intelligencer, 61
Leeds, 15, 46, 58, 60
Leguminosae, 20
Lenses, 2, 3, 17, 37, 39, 44, 56, 78.1
Lenses, Achromatic, 17, 42
Lenses, Aperture (stops), 56
Lenses, Cemented, 39, 42
Lenses, Coma of, 72b
Lenses, Diffusion, 72b
Lenses, double combination, 71, 72a, 75
Lenses, Flare, 78.1
Lenses, Focus equaliser, 71, 72a, 75
Lenses, ‘Ghost image’, 78.1
Lenses, Portrait, 72b
Lenses, Reade’s Solid eyepiece, 39, 42, 44, 78.1
Lenses, Soft focus, 71, 72a, 75
Lepidocyrtus curvicollis, 95, 100
Liebig, Baron Justus von, 20, 21, 22, 70.1, 85
Light, 2, 3, 60, 82
Light (transmitted and reflected), 104, 105
Limestone, 67
Lindley, John., 7, 8, 19
Lingwell–Gate, near Wakefield, 5, 13
Link, H. F., 19
Living Matter, 90.2
Londesborough (Lord), 40
London Institution, 16
Lowndes, Mr., 40
Lowne, Mr., 90.3
Lyte, Maxwell, 50

Malone, Thomas, 52
Malus, E (1775–1812), 60
Mantell, Gideon., 9, 27
Manure, 101
Marston Moor (Civil War), 66
Matthews, W. H. (Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages), 18
Mayall, J., 71
Melloni, M., 3, 82
Mercury (planet), 35
Metallic salts, 31, 32, 43, 54
Meteorological Society, 40
Meteors, 93
Methylated Spirit, 85
Mica, 9
Micro Fossils, 5, 9, 12, 13, 29
Micro–incineration, 4, 6, 8, 11, 19, 94
Microscope, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 17a, 57, 60, 67,
          73, 91, 92a, 92b, 95, 100, 101, 102, 103
Microscope, Achromatic Condenser, 100
Microscope, Binocular, 103
Microscope, Condensers, 57, 73, 82, 91, 92, 100
Microscope, Dark–ground ( and oblique) illumination, 1, 30, 57, 73, 91, 92, 95
Microscope, Immersion lens, 95, 96, 102
Microscope, resolution tests, test objects and ruled lines, 95, 100, 102
Microscope, solar, 2, 15, 16, 33, 81, 82
Microscopical Society of Illinois, 96
Microscopical Society of London, foundation of, 96
Microscopical Society of London, see also Royal Microscopical Society
Microscopy, 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 19, 21,
         22, 29, 30, 68, 90a, 90b
Millar, Dr. John, 51, 60, 71, 85, 90.3, 91,
      101, 106, 108.1, 108.3
Milner, Dr., 90.2
Milner, W., 60
Monads, 74
Monochromatic, 74
Moon, 48
MSS, 2b, 11b, 14, 15, 16, 17b, 23, 24, 26, 27, 34,
          35, 36a, 36b, 38, 40, 53, 69, 97a, 97b
‘Mulgrave Old Castle’, verse <
by J. B. Reade, 98
Mustard root, 10
Navicula acus, 102
Newton, Isaac (Bust of), 71
Nitrogen, 20, 21, 22
Norbert, F. A., 102
North British Review,46, 61, 62
Nottage, G. S., 62
Numismatic Society, 5, 13
Nut galls, 45, 46

Oblique refracted light, 1
Observatories, 24, 28, 35, 36b, 44, 47
Optics, 1, 2, 3, 17, 37, 39, 42, 44
Owen, Richard, 53, 96
Owen’s i>Odontography, 53
Oysters, 29, 30
Paley, William, 29
Parliament Frescoes, 77
Patents, 31, 46, 49, 59, 62
Peacock, George, 53
Peckham, 59
Perkins, J., of Bishopsbourne, 106
Peterson’s Third Comet, 28.7
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 96, 97
Photogenic Drawing, 14, 15, 16, 33
Photographic chemistry, 50
Photographic Journal, 49
Photographic Society, Amateur and Professional members, 83.2
Photographic Society, Presentation Prints to members, 83.2
Photographic Society, Soirée and Exhibition (1867), 78.2
Photographs with colour, 64
Photographs in Colour, not impossible, 99
Photography, 45, 46, 48, 51, 52, 58, 59, 61, 62, 64,66, 70,
               71, 72, 75, 76, 78, 80, 81, 83.1, 85, 87, 88, 89
Photography, accurate representation, 79
Photography, history of, 58
Photography, latent image: greatest discovery, 80, 81
Photography, public attitude in 1867, 80
Phycochrom, 74
Phycocyan, 74, 104, 105
Piccadilly, (No. 144), 40
Pigott, Dr G. W. Royston, 95, 96, 100
Planet Mercury, 35
Plants, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11
Pleurosigma, 100
Podura Scales (as test object for microscope resolution), 57a, 95, 96, 100
Poem (on ‘Mulgrave Old Castle’) by J. B. Reade, 98
Polarization, 60, 71
Polarized Light, 60, 61, 90.1, 92b, 100
Pollock, Baron Frederick, 79
Pollock, Henry, 48
Polychromatic, 74
Portraits, 71, 72a
Potash, 6, 8
Powell, Hugh (instrument maker), 57a
Price, Lake, 56
Prism (Reade’s Prism for microscopical illumination), 92, 100, 108.1
Pritchard, A., 1
Pritchard, C., 92b
Probate of J. B. Reades’s Will, 106
Proboscis of Blow Fly, 90.3
Prout, 48
Pseudo–Dichroism, 104, 105
Pseudo–tracheæ, 90.3
Pyrogallic acid, 64

Quekett, E. J., 96
Radiant heat, 3
Raspail, F. V., 11, 55
Reade, Charlotte Dorothy (1796–1882), née Farish,wife of JBR, 105
Reade, George (1813–1886), brother of JBR, 15, 36a, 106
Reade, J. B., Presidential Address to RMS, 96, 102
            his last days, 107.4-7
Reade, Miss (niece of JBR), 93
Reade, Thomas (1804–1883), brother of JBR, 106
Reade, Thomas S. B. (1776–1841), father of JBR), 15
Red Sea, coloured by algae, 84
Reeves, E. (Fee Farm Rent Office, (London), 34
Registration of Births, 18
Rejlander, O. G., 89
Religion, 35
Rhubarb leaves, 19
Richardson, Benjamin, 55
Rigg, Robert, 4, 7
Robinson, H. P., 83.2, 89
Roman Coin Moulds, 5, 13
Ross, 17a, 58, 95
Ross, Andrew, 49, 57a, 59, 81, 92a, 92b
Ross, Thomas, 57a
Royle, J. F., 11b <
Royal Astronomical Society, 28, 36a, 36b, 37, 47
Royal Microscopical Society, 21, 22, 96, 97, 102, 107, 108
          foundation as Microscopical Society of London, 96
          Journal of, 96
          Royal Charter of, 96
Royal Society, The   2, 11, 14, 17, 69, 96, 97, 108.3, 108.4
Rushfield, Miss, 23

Salmon, Miss [Susan?], 23
Saxon broach, 41
Schlieden, Matthias J. (1804–1881), 8
Science, 83.1
Scientific Papers, ‘cemented with imagination paste’, 84
Sculpture, North African limestone, 67
Selenite, 60
Shadbolt, George, 59, 82
Sharpey, Dr. (of Royal Society), 69, 97
Sheppard, R. B., 74, 104, 105
Silica, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12
Siliceous residue, 94
Silicification, 4
Silver, 52, 54
Silver Nitrate, 14
Silver salts, 31, 50
Smell, 76
Smith, Lyndon, 58, 61, 62
Smyth, H. R., 56
Smyth, Piazzi, 48
Smyth, W. H., 24, 47, 58, 65, 66, 67
Smyth, W. H., comment on early photography, 80
Solar microscope, see Microscope, solar
Solid–eypiece, see Lenses, Reade’s Solid–eypiece
Soluble Prussian Blue, 43
Sommer, H., 75
Sorby, H. C., 74
South, Sir James, 47
Spiral vessels in plants, 7, 10, 11, 19
Stereoscope, 62
Stereoscopic, 63
Stevenson, Binocular Microscope, 103
Stodder, Charles (of Boston), 102
Stomata, 19
Stone (Bucks), 24, 26, 27, 34, 35, 36, 40, 41, 44, 65
Stone (Bucks) Church, 26, 65
Stone (Bucks) Observatory, 24, 28.7, 44
Stone (Bucks) School, 26
Sugar, 22
Sulphide of Ammonia, 76, 77
Sun, 37, 48, 87
Swan, J. W., 76
Swanton, J. Clerke (Curate at Bishopsbourne), 106
Sword (Cromwellian), 66

Talbot v. Laroche, 49, 81b
Talbot, W. H. F., 14, 45, 46, 49, 58, 59, 61, 62, 70.1, 80, 81
Tannin, 85
Tanning, 45
Telescope, 17, 24, 25, 37, 39, 42, 44, 47, 48, 87
Telescope at Wandsworth, 48, 87
Theories of Life, 90.2
Thermal rays, see Heat
Thermometer, 36b
The Times (London), 108.3, 108.4
Tobacco, 85
Tomkins, 57a
Tooth (illustration of), 96
Topaz lens (A. Claudet's), 83.2
Trientalis Europa, 16, 33
Tripoli powder, 13
Tully Optical Instruments, 17a, 47
Turnip, 104
Turpin, P. J. F., 9

Vermilion water colour, 104
Verney, Sir Henry, 27
Vulliamy, B. L., his clock, 47
Wallich, G. C., 92a, 100, 108
Wandsworth, 87
Ward, N. B., 96
Waterhouse, John, 54, 56, 57a, 71, 92a
Waterhouse stops, 56
Water–colours, mixed transparent
and opaque, 104, 105
Webster's Condensor, 73
Wedgwood, Tom, 45, 58
Wenham F., 92, 95, 100
Wheat leaf, 11
Wheatstone, Charles, 2b
Whitby (Yorkshire), 98
White, Dr. T. Charters, 105
Will of JBR, 106
Willats, T. (of Cheapside, London): Photographic Manual, 46
William IV, 70.2
Williams, Dr. Thomas, 19
Williams, Mr, 36a
Wine, 24
Women, at Photographic Society, 78.2
Woodward, J. J., 95d, 102

Xanthidia, 9, 12, 29
Yellow filter, 87
Young, Thomas, 45, 53, 80



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